Live-Action ERASED Film’s Clip Features Airi, Satoru

Japanese entertainment news website Comic Natalie began streaming a 25-second clip on Thursday from the live-action film of Kei Sanbe‘s Boku dake ga Inai Machi (The Town Where Only I Am Missing) manga. The scene features Satoru (played by Tatsuya Fujiwara) and Airi (Kasumi Arimura).

Airi: I wasn’t able to do anything for him with my small hands. I want to believe you for my own sake. I want to think there is something I can do with my own hands.

The manga’s story follows Satoru, a struggling manga artist who has the ability to turn back time and prevent deaths. When his mother is killed he turns back time to solve the mystery, but ends up back in elementary school, just before the disappearance of his classmate Kayo.

The film’s cast includes:

  • Tatsuya Fujiwara (live-action Death Note, Rurouni Kenshin) as the protagonist Satoru Fujinuma.
  • Kasumi Arimura (When Marnie Was There, live-action Strobe Edge) as Airi Katagiri, Satoru’s part-time job coworker.
  • Yuriko Ishida (Princess Mononoke, From Up On Poppy Hill) as Satoru’s mother.

My Hero Academia Anime Casts Kaori Nazuka, Tooru Nara, More

This year’s 15th issue of Shueisha‘s Weekly Shonen Jump magazine will reveal four more cast members and rough characters designs for the television anime of Kōhei Horikoshi‘s My Hero Academia (Boku no Hero Academia) manga on Monday. The new cast members are:

Kosuke Miyoshi as Mashirao Ojiro
Masakazu Nishida as Hanta Sero
Kaori Nazuka as Tooru Hagakure
Tooru Nara as Rikidō Satō

The magazine will also reveal a rough character design for Kōji Kōda, but he does not have a cast member.

Previously-announced cast members include:

Daiki Yamashita as Izuku Midoriya
Kenta Miyake as All Might
Nobuhiko Okamoto as Katsuki Bakugō
Ayane Sakura as Ochako Uraraka
Kaito Ishikawa as Tenya Iida
Aoi Yūki as Tsuyu Asui
Ryou Hirohashi as Minoru Mineta
Marina Inoue as Momo Yaoyorozu
Yoshimasa Hosoya as Fumikage Tokoyami
Tasuku Hatanaka as Denki Kaminari
Toshiki Masuda as Eijirō Kirishima
Yuuki Kaji as Shōto Todoroki
Eri Kitamura as Mina Ashido

Joker Game Anime Streams 3rd Promo

Miyoshi: In the autumn of year 12 of the Shōwa era, the flames of the World War are being fanned.
Fukumoto: A spy school is established within the imperial army.
Text: Spy Training Organization
Odagiri: The ones who passed the cruel selection exams are the students whose personal information, purpose, and even age became top secret information.
Text: Trainees
Kaminaga: The men who easily overcame the training that forces one to surpass the limits of one’s mental and physical abilities…
Tazaki: Begin their covert activities in various locations under the control of the organization’s founder, Commander Yūki. Text: They head out into the world as spies…
Amari: And so, a new intelligence organization was born.
Text: Spy organization
Hatano: Its name: Organization D.
Man: After they leave here, they must all scatter over the world and become an unseen existence.
Hatano: Ryōsuke Hatano… I’m a transfer student from Japan.
Marie: Are you really Japanese?
Alan: Just what are you??
Hatano: Don’t give information to the opposite party.
There is no doubt in my mind that he is a spy.
Alan: I do not fear death, for the sake of my precious comrades and motherland.

The Differences Between Anime and Cartoon

ebfnmfjhbtjCartoon is a term that once referred to fine art during the renaissance period. Somehow, though, the term’s meaning evolved (or devolved, depending on how you look at it) into humorous and witty illustrations and, finally, into animated programs meant to entertain people, mostly children. For, clarity, the term ‘cartoon’ in this article shall be referring to the animated programs. Recently, however, a new term has been coined: Anime. And the distinction between these two has caused much confusion.

Strictly speaking though, there should be no distinction between anime and cartoon. Anime is a term used by the Japanese to refer to animated cartoons, from their own country and from others as well. Somehow, though, the world started using the term anime in reference to Japanese cartoons exclusively. Japanese animation was once called japanimation, but this term was aptly discarded when the term ‘Anime’ was put into use.

Some say that they see absolutely no difference between the two, even going so far as to classify both cartoons and anime as ‘childish’ because of the nature of how they

Hidden Messages Inside Anime

20-of-the-best-anime-series-ever-created-3Anime is one of the best things that could possibly happen to television. Since its debut outside Japan, anime has reeled in millions and millions of fans. However, there are those that remain skeptical of anime, thinking of it only as a glammed up version of the typical cartoons that we see on TV. They take one look at the too perfect faces, the out of his world costumes, and the quintessential talking animals and they immediately dismiss anime as childish. Well, we as watchers of anime know that there’s much more to anime beneath its cartoonish facade.

There are several hidden messages in anime, messages that speak directly to the soul, messages about life’s lessons and truths. They might be hard to see at face value but if you look past all the humor and all the drama, you’ll see that what the characters are going through, be it a robot invasion or one-on-one battle with a dragon, are essentially the same things that we’re going through… just translated into fantasy. And every obstacle they

Funimation Announces My Hero Academia Anime Rights

If you were wondering where you were going to end up watching the upcoming anime adaptation of Kohei Horikoshi’s My Hero Academia, Funimation has you covered. Earlier today the company announced the acquisition of the exclusive international rights to the series, which is set to premiere in the U.S., Canada, and UK this April.

Funimation’s acquisition includes the international rights to home entertainment, video on demand, merchandise, and broadcast distribution. The first episode of the BONES-produced adaptation will premiere in April on the FunimationNow streaming service. 

Synopsis:

There’s a new hero in town! “My Hero Academia” is a superhero origin story that soars to the top of the class!

Izuku has dreamt of being a hero all his life—a lofty goal for anyone, but especially challenging for a kid with no superpowers. That’s right, in a world where eighty percent of the population has some kind of super-powered “quirk,” Izuku was unlucky enough to be born completely normal. But that’s not going to stop him from enrolling in one of the world’s most prestigious hero academies. Now, the only thing standing between him and his first class is the academy’s formidable entrance exam—nothing a little

How would you rate episode 10 of Haruchika Haruta & Chika ?

The most rewarding episodes of HaruChika are those that manage to move the regular plot forward along with the mystery-of-the-week. Usually it’s a quieter interpersonal drama, focused on the core feelings and struggles of our cast. This week, we get a much bigger push forward for everyone: the band competition! The brass band club is ready to prove itself in the B group, and they’re not the only ones.

Both Chika and Haruta have recently sustained injuries. Chika’s was due to a daring rescue of a little boy from a tall apartment building, and Haruta got his from an ordeal with a cat. When Haruta goes missing—and Chika disappears in search of him—she runs across a reporter, wondering if he’s there to hear about her ordeal. He does want to talk to her, but not about that. No, he wants to find out from the students themselves about the teacher they love so much, Mr. Kusakabe.

Leading up to that moment, we get lots of fun rapport between the club members, deepening what we’ve previously learned about them. Narushima becomes the keeper of the club when Haruta and Chika are off on their weekly adventure, and Serizawa hovers around

Koei Tecmo Streams Costume Video for Attack on Titan Game

The Christmas-themed costumes launched on Thursday, and costume pack bundles are slated for March 17. The new DLC is 350 yen per costume or 1,200 yen for the whole set of four. A Christmas weapon pack that includes a Christmas tree, Santa boots,, and Christmas cake is an additional 350 yen.

KOEI Tecmo Games’ Omega Force subsidiary (Warriors/Musou franchise) developed the game for PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, and PS Vita and released it in Japan on February 18. The game is also slated for North America and Europe this year.

The PS4 and PS3 regular package editions retail for 7,800 yen (US$63), and the PS4 and PS3 download editions retail for 6,762 yen (US$55). The regular PS Vita package edition retails for 6,800 yen (US$55) and the download edition retails for 6,000 yen (US$49).

FLOW to Perform Theme Song for Tales of Berseria RPG

This year’s 15th issue of Shueisha‘s Weekly Shonen Jump magazine will announce on Monday that the rock band FLOW (The Seven Deadly Sins, Eureka Seven) will perform the theme song “BURN” for Bandai Namco Entertainment‘s upcoming Tales of Berseria role-playing game.

In addition, the magazine will reveal two more characters. Satomi Satou will play Magiru, an unidentified travelling witch designed by Daigo Okumura. She’s a lively person, but she has a dark side. Naomi Nagasawa will play Bien Phu, a strange Malak who wears a hat.

The other revealed characters in the game include:

Rina Satou as Velvet Crowe
Designed by: Mutsumi Inomata

Azumi Asakura as Laphicet
Designed by: Minoru Iwamoto

Daisuke Kishio as Rokuro
Designed by: Daigo Okumura

Ami Koshimizu as Eleanor
Designed by: Kousuke Fujishima

The game is set in a world called Wasteland, on a continent named Glenwood — the same continent as the previous Tales of Zestiria, although in a much earlier time period. Central to the setting is the Sacred Kingdom of Midgand, which stretches across multiple

Mayoiga Original Anime Adds 5 New Cast Members

The official website for the Mayoiga original TV anime series updated on Wednesday with five additional cast members. Diomedea‘s official Twitter account also posted an updated key visual with the new characters.

The new cast members are:

Ayaka Shimizu (Sasameki Koto‘s Masaki Akemiya) as Maimai, a 17-year-old student who confessed to the guy she liked but was totally rejected.

 

Ai Kakuma (Aldnoah.Zero‘s Nina Klein) as Lovepon, a 15-year-old girl who does not get along with her dad.

 

Kosuke Miyoshi (My Hero Academia‘s Mashirao Ojiro) as Jack, a 16-year-old boy with a mysterious past. He is receiving treatment for a tumor from his family.

 

Yoshiaki Hasegawa (Hundred’s Hayato Kisaragi) as Yura Mikage, a 24-year-old trading company employee who is on track for high positions.

 

Konomi Tada (Girls und Panzer‘s Karina Sakaguchi) as Nanko, a 17-year-old great detective whose perceptions and reactions are a little different from those around her, but she conceals a lot of talent.

 

Previously-announced cast includes:

Kōdai Sakai (Pupa’s Yuuhei Arita) as 16-year-old student Mitsumune. His grades are excellent but he doesn’t boast about it,

How would you rate episode 4 of ERASED ?

Satoru set up a whole bunch of rules for himself regarding his heroic journey into the past. Most of these rules related to his new friendship with Hinazuki, and how it would end up saving her. Become friends with Hinazuki, and she’ll no longer be a target of the serial killer. Invite her to your party, and she’ll have a reason to stay alive. Keep her safe past X-Day, and the future will be changed. Change just one thing, and that will inevitably lead to a better tomorrow.

For most of this episode, Satoru isn’t punished for embracing these arbitrary beliefs. His attempts to get closer to Hinazuki generally work, and when he isn’t able to personally get his way, his mom steps in to help him. Satoru’s friends help him find time alone with his “crush,” and his pushy demands don’t seem to bother Hinazuki. A trip to the local museum presents some temporary anxieties, as Satoru realizes his current journey is actually overlapping significantly with the events of the past; but then his friends arrive, and Satoru assures himself that the path of history has been changed. And when X-Day passes and Hinazuki waves a fond goodbye after the

How would you rate episode 5 of ERASED ?

ERASED took an unfortunate step down this week, in an outsourced episode that demonstrated few of the show’s great strengths and all of its weaknesses. It was propelled largely by base plot beats over atmosphere, and what scenes weren’t more or less inert in terms of direction tended to oversell their drama. It’s difficult for any show to maintain consistent polish from first episode to last, but it’s never a fun thing to see.

In the wake of last week’s unexpected absence, Satoru ended up running over to Hinazuki’s house, where he found that she wasn’t in the shed, but that an adult man had visited it some time in the last day. Following that, a couple shots from inside the house gave the game away: Hinazuki was already dead, her parents were likely responsible, and they were unsure of how to deal with the situation. It’s beginning to seem likely that Hinazuki’s situation might have just been “conveniently” close to the serial killings time-wise, and that her parents only got away with murder because of the other killer on the loose.

The next few scenes of the episode played out just like Satoru might have expected, with all of

Crunchyroll Adds Bokurano, Reveals Date for Digimon Adventures tri. Part 2

Crunchyroll added the anime Bokurano to its streaming catalog in the United States and Canada on Tuesday. The full 24-episode series is available for premium members, and free users will be able to watch 12 new episodes a week.

Crunchyroll describes the story:

When a strange man in a grotto by the sea offers fifteen middle-school students the chance to test the game he’s been developing, the kids find little reason not to accept. Who wouldn’t want to pilot a giant robot and face down intruders bent on destroying Earth? Instead of a game, however, the youths discover that the metal giant is all too real–and so are the enemies! It only gets worse when they realize that the ‘contract’ they signed to play the game was no laughing matter. The robot feeds on the life force of its pilot. Even if they win, they die. But if they lose, the world will cease to exist!Despair grips the children as they learn the rules of the contract and the nature of the game they signed up to play. And as they reveal the true nature of the enemy–an enemy that seems

How would you rate episode 3 of ERASED ?

As a traditional thriller, ERASED certainly knows how to build its dramatic hooks into the fundamental elements of its storytelling. As this episode opened, Satoru began to piece together the exact details of Hanazuki’s disappearance, reasoning that because she died at ten, Hinazuki had to have been abducted some time between March 1st and her birthday. As small scenes at school played out, Satoru began narrowing down the potential death window while also doing his best to protect Hinazuki in the meantime, eventually learning he had eleven days to save her. That narrative clock was given further significance through a meeting between Satoru and his teacher, where he learned there was already a case being built against Hinazuki’s abusive mother. The gears of this story all feel natural, and its overall structure feels very tightly composed; as far as the overt plot goes, ERASED is a confident and propulsive machine.

But praising the precision of the storytelling feels like an insufficient way to describe ERASED. This is a strong story, but the way it’s being told is the real star here. The early scenes of this episode, where Satoru found himself pitted in an ice

How would you rate episode 1 of ERASED ?

There is a whole lot worth talking about when it comes to ERASED. Even the base premise is complex enough to fill an easy paragraph, what with Satoru’s adult ennui, his Revival power, the bloody drama that sparks his return to childhood, and the kidnapping mystery awaiting him there. You’d think a show that juggles two distinct time periods, an additional supernatural time-traveling power, and a secret serial killer would come off as a little too busy, but ERASED manages that and then some. Not only is it satisfying as an immediate drama, it’s also rich in relevant thematic undertones, and marvelously produced aside. I don’t always find myself interested in anime’s marquee shows, but if ERASED is destined to be this season’s big hit, I am all for it.

ERASED‘s strengths begin with its stellar direction, courtesy of Sword Art Online/Silver Spoon director Tomohiko Ito. Ito’s always been a talented director, but adapting poorly written light novels and slice of life manga haven’t necessarily given him a chance to stretch his muscles; here, his gifts for tone and drama are put to use in elevating an

How would you rate episode 10 of ERASED ?

I don’t really feel happy reviewing this episode. I’ve been enjoying this show, enjoying it a lot – after Shōwa Genroku Rakugo Shinjū and Grimgar, it’s represented the final top-tier pillar of the season for me. It’s sometimes gone over the top in its thriller theatrics, but its execution has been generally excellent, and it seemed like it was building towards some compelling points about community and trust.

But this episode was a disaster.

It was a disaster that’s been a long time coming, in retrospect. The show hasn’t left itself many avenues for revealing who the killer is – outside of Yuuki himself, basically the only potential suspect has been Mr. Yashiro. Having only one relevant character doesn’t make for much of a mystery, and beyond that, Mr. Yashiro has served a fairly instrumental role in the plot. It’d be somewhat disappointing for the killer to be someone we didn’t know, but it’d be far more disappointing for it to be Mr. Yashiro, who’s both the overtly obvious choice and a character who’s come to stand as a counterpoint to the underlying atmosphere of suspicion in the show. If ERASED is a show about anything, it is

Anime Fan Fest is Proud to Announce Guest Marc Swint

So here’s a story… Before “New-Media” officially had a name, there was a kid in Philadelphia who had a $20 microphone which he’d bought at a game store (there used to be more than one). At first he’d record himself doing voices, and emulating performances to the riveted audience of his cat.

Along this journey, he’d eventually find himself auditioning for fandubs and indie games on the internet. A bunch of projects that never happened, a dash of podcasting, with a sprinkle of time and a little bit of dumb luck meeting at the intersection of what we’ll call “mostly-preparedness” later, that kid became Marc Swint.

Marc is a Philadelphia based voice actor, writer and new-media producer who still… mostly works on the internet. And it’s there that you’ll find him working with Bennett The Sage on Anime Abandon, Team Four Star on Whatever They’re Working On Abridged and whoever else darkens his door with a project that he’d deign to call “neato” or “the bees knees”.

On those occasions that he works in meatspace, through a flurry of “Additional Voice” credits, he’s managed to voice Mason in Mass Effect: Paragon Lost, Isaac Tukura in Modern Combat 5, additional voices in Dungeon Hunter

Crunchyroll Adds Bokurano, Reveals Date for Digimon Adventures tri. Part 2

Crunchyroll added the anime Bokurano to its streaming catalog in the United States and Canada on Tuesday. The full 24-episode series is available for premium members, and free users will be able to watch 12 new episodes a week.

Crunchyroll describes the story:

When a strange man in a grotto by the sea offers fifteen middle-school students the chance to test the game he’s been developing, the kids find little reason not to accept. Who wouldn’t want to pilot a giant robot and face down intruders bent on destroying Earth? Instead of a game, however, the youths discover that the metal giant is all too real–and so are the enemies! It only gets worse when they realize that the ‘contract’ they signed to play the game was no laughing matter. The robot feeds on the life force of its pilot. Even if they win, they die. But if they lose, the world will cease to exist!Despair grips the children as they learn the rules of the contract and the nature of the game they signed up to play. And as they reveal the true nature of the enemy–an enemy that seems to be all too

Sentai Filmworks Adds Hatenkou Yugi Anime

Sentai Filmworks announced a new license today with the addition of 2008 comedy-fantasy anime Hatenkou Yugi. The series—which was directed by Nobuhiro Takamoto (Beelzebub), with Yasuhiro Imagawa (Souten no Ken) on series composition for the Studio DEEN production—will be available soon digitally, with a home video release to follow.

Synopsis:

Having been lovingly kicked out of her home with the words, “Don’t you wanna see the world a little?” 15-year-old Rahzel Anadis suddenly finds herself traveling from town to town. Her journey is off to a rough start when she’s joined by Alzeid, a young man seeking revenge for his father’s murder. The two do have a few things in common: they can both use magic, and they both despise each other. Despite their animosity, Rahzel and Alzeid travel together, helping people in other cities and discovering what it really means to “see the world.”

Woman-as-Sushi Plate Scene Gets Detective Conan Its 1st BPO Complaint in a Decade

The Japanese Broadcasting Ethics and Program Improvement Organization (BPO) watchdog group recently published viewer complaints from February, one stemming from a nyotaimori scene from an evening anime program. Nyotaimori is the practice of eating sushi off a woman’s naked body. The complaint asks for consideration of the ethical implications, the time zone when the program aired, and the potential impact on children.

The specific anime the scene appeared in isn’t identified, although a similar scene took place in episode 808 of Detective Conan that aired on February 13. The woman in the scene is censored.

This is first BPO published complaint for Detective Conan in 10 years. The last complaint was published in 2006 and generally disagreed with the anime’s subject matter and art style, stating that the children’s style animation wasn’t appropriate for a show that focused on murder.

Last month, Mr. Osomatsu caught the ire of viewers for its masturbation scene.

The BPO published viewer complaints in November stemming from a scene in Yōkai Watch. The complaint regards a “suggestive” banana-eating scene. In October the BPO also published viewer complaints stemming from a scene in Mobile Suit Gundam: Iron-Blooded Orphans, in August,